A radio read


Kerrie Wood Thomson’s book “Diary of a Public Radio Slave” is a short but entertaining read. A romp through a radio station in the Us building up to an annual pledge week to raise fund, and the visit of a giant of Public Radio. A jolly good read that you can download for under £1 at www.amazon.co.uk/Diary-Public-Radio-Slave-Thomson

Another Kerrie is Kerrie Miller at Minnesota Public Radio with a book review programme and always a good list of book choices on her page at http://minnesota.publicradio.org/projects/ongoing/midmorning_books/  

Follow her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/KerriMPR She co-hosts the Daily Circuit Radio Show which you can follow on Twitter at https://twitter.com/DailyCircuit and listen online at http://minnesota.publicradio.org/radio/programs/daily_circuit/

If you are into National Public Radio then you may wish to read The Sound and the Story: NPR and the Art of Radio. This 1995 book is available from £2 on Amazon. It’s “An inside look at a popular radio network analyzes its size in relation to its following, introduces the personalities behind such programs as Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and weighs the effects of television on radio broadcasting”. www.amazon.co.uk/The-Sound-Story-NPR-Radio

I seem to be stuck in an all-American mode today and we head next to the Smithsonian magazine, always a good read .

The story of how a family were found in 1978 in Siberia with no idea that World War II had ended, was both fascinating and disturbing http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/For-40-Years-This-Russian-Family-Was-Cut-Off-From-Human-Contact-Unaware-of-World-War-II-188843001.html You can watch the television documentary footage, in Russian, of “Lost in the Taiga” at the You Tube channel www.youtube.com/user/pilgrim2heaven 

The 2010 article on 100 years of Public Radio is worth your time too. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/Radio-Activity-The-100th-Anniversary-of-Public-Broadcasting.html 

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